Week 1- discussion board
My topic of choice is controlling project schedule.
Although, project teams and organizations give considerable effort and use different well accepted tools for the estimation of the projects, however some organizations fall short when it comes to controlling these estimations.  In reality many projects face uncertainties such as labor efficiency, equipment efficiency, weather, design and so many different ones (Yun-yan,2012). These uncertainties cause the schedule overrun, which could be avoided by effective management and control of the planned schedule.  Controlling the project schedule is defined as a process to monitor the status of the project activities and if needed to update the progress and manage changes to the schedule baseline (PMI, 2013).
Managing time, and especially managing the schedule of the projects and adhering to the pre-estimated schedule is a source of challenge for many professionals and project managers. The problem of project delays is a world-wide phenomenon. Failure to achieve targeted time can cause various unexpected negative effects such as loss of revenue, compromised quality and etc (Lindhard & Wandahl,2014; Oyedele et al.,2015). For this reason, better monitor and control of the schedule can help to define and mitigate the uncertainties and their effect on the project in time without causing negative results.
Hence, the following questions will be answered in the paper:
Q1: What are the effects of schedule controlling on project results?
Q2: What are the main techniques for controlling the schedule?
References:
Băncescu, M. (2016). Controlling Project Schedule Progress, Using Control Charts. Cybernetics and Systems, 47(7), 602–615.
Jun-yan, L. (2012). Schedule uncertainty control: A literature review. Physics Procedia, 33, 1842-1848.
Lindhard S, Wandahl S. 2014. Exploration of the reasons for delays in construction. International Journal of Construction Management. 14(1):36–44
Oyedele LO, Jaiyeoba BE, Kadiri KO, Folagbade SO, Tijani IK. Salami RO. 2015. Critical factors affecting construction quality in Nigeria: evidence from industry professionals. International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development. 6(2):103–113.
PMI. 2013. A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK guide) (5th ed.). Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute, Inc.
Week 2
This week I reviewed literature concerning my first research question: What are the effects of schedule controlling on project results?
Considering the importance of meeting the project cost and schedule goals, there have been a wide variety of project tools proposed to plan and monitor both areas. However, according to numerous findings document projects that widely went out of budget and schedule (Yourdon, 2003).
The frequent cites about the reasons of schedule and budget overrun are numerous, such as planning, estimation, inadequate team, inadequate project management skills, misalignment between project team and the business of the organization. Finally, monitoring and controlling during the project execution are also considered an important factor which affects project goals in terms of time and cost (Johnson et al.,2001).
Additionally, literature also emphasizes some advantages of having proper schedule monitor and control on project efficiency and effectiveness.
The most important reason for schedule control is its ability to give real picture of the work procedures and performance which enables the project team to analyze the reasons of delays, make informed decisions and manage the uncertainties as early as possible (Kursave,2003).Activating any adjustment late into the project is often ineffective and expensive (Nepal et al., 2006): the later the corrective action, the less the ability of influencing the project outcomes. Thus, the most effective managerial control is the one carried out timely.
Additionally, proper planned schedule monitoring and control can help the project team to mitigate the risks coming from last minute efforts to reach the deadline. By this way uncontrolled schedules lead to overtimes, faster work phases, higher costs and compromised quality to reach the deadline (Ford et al, 2007). 
Finally, schedule control can help to understand the ripple effects of the individual activities on other project activities and overall project deadline target (Reichelt and Lyneis, 1999).
References :
Ford, D. N., Lyneis, J. M., & Taylor, T. (2007). Project controls to minimize cost and schedule overruns: A model, research agenda, and initial results. In 2007 International System Dynamics Conference (pp. 23-27).
Johnson, J. A., Boucher, K. D., Connors, K., & Robinson, J. (2001). Project management: the criteria for success. Software Magazine, 21(1), S3-S11.
Kursave, J. D. (2003). The necessity of project schedule updating/monitoring/statusing. Cost engineering, 45(7), 8.
Nepal, M. P., Park, M., & Son, B. (2006). Effects of schedule pressure on construction performance. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 132(2), 182-188.
Reichelt, K., & Lyneis, J. (1999). The dynamics of project performance: benchmarking the drivers of cost and schedule overrun. European management journal, 17(2), 135-150.
Yourdon, E.  (2003). Death  March,  2nd  ed.  Prentice Hall, Inc:  NewJersey
Week 3
Please find below my findings from the literature review on “Controlling Project Schedule”.
This week I made a review of literature on the methods for controlling project schedule.
Considering the numerous challenges faced during the progress of the project schedule statistical calculation helps for controlling the progress (Colin & Vanhoucke,2014). According to the literature the commonly accepted tool for controlling project schedule is Earned Value Management (EVM). EVM can provide key performance metrics which enable project managers to analyze the variance between the actual and planned performance in terms of both time and cost performance. A Schedule Performance Index (SPI) less than 1 indicated inefficiency in schedule and deviation from the baseline (Acebes et al.,2014).
However, Bancescu (2016), asserts that SPI index is not the comprehensive and decisive information for triggering the control of the project management schedule. A suggested Statistical Process Control (SPC) can give us information whether the project manager needs to be alerted because of deviation or not, as it depends on control limits calculated with the statistical means (Vanhoucke,2011).
Next to the research made on EVM, project control charts also received attention as a tool for project monitoring and control. Control charts allows monitoring a schedule performance in terms on center line and upper and lower control limits. Control limits indicate when control actions should be taken (Badiru & Kovach, 2012).
Literature also, gives an emphasis on the integration of EVM and control charts for the effective project schedule monitoring and control (Bancescu, 2016).
References: 
Acebes, F., T. Pajares, J. M. Galan, and A. Lopez-Paredez. 2014. A new approach for project control under uncertainty. Going back to the basics. International Journal of Project Management 32:423–34.
Badiru, A., and T. Kovach. 2012. Statistical techniques for project control. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
Colin, J., and M. Vanhoucke. 2014. Setting tolerance limits for statistical project control using earned value management. Omega – The International Journal of Management Science 49:107–22.
Mioara Băncescu (2016) Controlling Project Schedule Progress, Using Control Charts, Cybernetics, and Systems, 47:7, 602-615.
Vanhoucke, M. 2011. On the dynamic use of project performance and schedule risk information during project tracking. Omega – The International Journal of Management Science 39:416–26
Week 4
This week I continued my literature review on different views about the control of project schedule.
According to this week’s review I discovered that apart from using effective scheduling techniques, literature also gives importance to the analysis of the delays of project schedules. This finding made me to review my research questions and consider delay analysis techniques in my literature review too. As delays are unavoidable circumstance in every project, I found it very useful to extend my research into that body of knowledge too.
According to the literature I discovered several approaches for the delay analysis and schedule updating. For example, Oliveros and Fayek (2005) introduce fuzzy logic approach for the activity delay analysis. With this model they introduce a way to analyze different types of delays in different activities and their effects on project completion dates. The system gives the opportunity to categorize different delays, estimate delay durations, make necessary updates on the schedule.
Additionally, Bubshait and Cunningham (1998) analyze three more delay analysis methods in their paper. These methods are As-planned Method, As-built Method and Modified As-built Method. The article elaborates the similarities and differences between these methods and describes Modified As-built Method as more comprehensive and practical one. This method helps to consider the impact of every single activity delay on the project and recalculate the schedule again.
Furthermore, a new delay analysis technique by Battika and Alkaas (1994) also captured my attention. They introduce new technique for the delay analysis called MIA which is utilized in an integrated computer system. The model aims to facilitate the analysis and schedule update process by minimizing the time and cost of claims preparation.
Considering all the mentioned approaches and importance of the delay analysis for the schedule control I will consider this topic as one of the research questions in my literature review.
References :
Battikha, M., & Alkass, S. (1994). A cost-effective delay analysis technique. AACE International Transactions, 1994, DCL4-1.
Bubshait, A. A., & Cunningham, M. J. (1998). Comparison of delay analysis methodologies. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 124(4), 315-322.
Finke, M. R. (1999). Window analyses of compensable delays. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 125(2), 96-100.
Lorterapong, P., & Moselhi, O. (1996). Project-network analysis using fuzzy sets theory. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 122(4), 308-318.
Oliveros, A. V. O., & Fayek, A. R. (2005). Fuzzy logic approach for activity delay analysis and schedule updating. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 131(1), 42-51.
Week 5
During this course my main topic for the research was schedule control of projects. As per my previous knowledge I was aware of the importance of iron triangle (scope, schedule, cost) for the performance of the projects. Additionally, I had an understanding that monitoring and control of the scope, cost, and schedule plays as much important role as the initial planning in those areas for the success of projects. However, only after this research I was able to dive deep into schedule control and learn about different thoughts in that area.
For the beginning, I have learnt a lot about the impact of strong schedule control practices on project success. According to the literature proper schedule control is related to myriad of project success factors in terms of efficiency and effectiveness, such as early detection and mitigation of the risks, understanding of ripple effects of project delays and preparing early action plans if needed to mitigate the effects of delays (Lindhard & Wandahl,2014; Oyedele et al.,2015).
Additionally, I have learnt about different methods for controlling the project schedule such as Earned Value Management (EVM), Statistical Process Control (SPC) and project control charts. All these methods help in evaluating and monitoring the performance of the project in terms of schedule performance, by trying to identify the variance between actual and planned schedule and identifying the main points of the delays where necessary and immediate action is required (Colin & Vanhoucke, 2014; Vanhoucke,2011)
Furthermore, in addition to my initial research questions I realized that literature also concentrated on the topic such as the analysis of the delays in terms of their impact on projects and integrating them in the initially planned project schedule. For this reason, I also added the following question my into literature review:
Q3 – Approaches to the delay analysis and schedule updating.
Although the literature gives some information in this area introducing delay analysis techniques such ad such as As planned, As Build, Modified as build Methods and fuzzy logic approach, I was not able to find sound research body elaborating on the practical tools for the analysis of the delays on project activities (Bubshait & Cunningham, 1998; Oliveros & Fayek, 2005)
For the above-mentioned reasons, I will focus on the three research questions in my literature review:
Q1: What are the effects of schedule controlling on project results?
Q2: What are the main techniques for controlling the schedule?
Q3 : What are the main approaches to the delay analysis and schedule updating?
References :
Bubshait, A. A., & Cunningham, M. J. (1998). Comparison of delay analysis methodologies. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 124(4), 315-322
Colin, J., and M. Vanhoucke. 2014. Setting tolerance limits for statistical project control using earned value management. Omega – The International Journal of Management Science 49:107–22.
Lindhard S, Wandahl S. 2014. Exploration of the reasons for delays in construction. International Journal of Construction Management. 14(1):36–44
Oyedele LO, Jaiyeoba BE, Kadiri KO, Folagbade SO, Tijani IK. Salami RO. 2015. Critical factors affecting construction quality in Nigeria: evidence from industry professionals. International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development. 6(2):103–113.
Oliveros, A. V. O., & Fayek, A. R. (2005). Fuzzy logic approach for activity delay analysis and schedule updating. Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 131(1), 42-51.
Vanhoucke, M. 2011. On the dynamic use of project performance and schedule risk information during project tracking. Omega – The International Journal of Management Science 39:416–26

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL – NO PLAGIARISM

(USA, AUS, UK & CA PhD. Writers)

CLICK HERE TO GET A PROFESSIONAL WRITER TO WORK ON THIS PAPER AND OTHER SIMILAR PAPERS

The Best Custom Essay Writing Service

About Our Service

We are an online academic writing company that connects talented freelance writers with students in need of their services. Unlike other writing companies, our team is made up of native English speakers from countries such as the USA, UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and New Zealand.

Qualified Writers

Our Guarantees:

CLICK TO SUBMIT YOUR ORDER