College of Administrative and Financial Sciences Assignment 2 Deadline: 27/3/2021 @ 23:59 Course Name: Logistics Management Student’s Name: Course Code: MGT322 Student’s ID Number: Semester: II CRN: Academic Year: 1441/1442 H For Instructor’s Use only Instructor’s Name: Students’ Grade: Level of Marks: Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY • The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder. • Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted. • Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page. • Students must mention question number clearly in their answer. • Late submission will NOT be accepted. • Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions. • All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism). • Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted. Logistics Management ASSIGNMENT -2 Submission Date by students: Before the end of Week- 10th Place of Submission: Students Grade Centre Weight: 5 Marks Learning Outcome: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of how global competitive environments are changing supply chain management and logistics practice. 2. Apply essential elements of core logistic and supply chain management principles. 3. Analyze and identify challenges and issues pertaining to logistical processes. Assignment Workload: This assignment is an individual assignment. Critical Thinking In today’s highly competitive, extremely variable and dynamic environment, many firms are seeking solutions. Supply chain management becomes more sophisticated and the difference between what firms want to achieve and what they can do in-house continues to grow, firms begin to realize that doing the right thing becomes more interesting than doing everything. Accordingly, they becoming better focused and more specialized by outsourcing and offshoring activities that are far from their core businesses. In many cases, firms decide to outsource this function in whole or in part to agents or third party logistics firms. Using this concept of offshoring and outsourcing answer the following questions by conceding any Saudi Local company or any Multinational company. Question: 1. What are the roles of Third party logistics firms in a smooth running of Supply chain process of a multinational organization? (1.5 Mark) 2. What are the motivational factors companies going internationally? (1.5 Mark) 3. On what ground companies choose developing countries location for offshoring. Use examples. (Mention the country and decisive factors) (1.5 Mark) 4. References (Use APA style of referencing (0.5 Mark) The Answer must follow the Key word/ outline points below: • Each answer should be 300 to 500 range of word counts. • Outsourcing , offshoring ,Third Party logistics • Their Main functions • Motivational Factors /Drivers • Reasons with suitable Examples • Reference Note: You can support your answer by reading chapter 4 of your book. You can use secondary source available on internet. Slide 4.1 Part Two: Leveraging logistics operations Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.2 Chapter 4: Managing logistics internationally Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.3 Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.4 Figure 4.1 Decision framework for international logistics Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.5 Table 4.1 The fourth-generation global shift in Europe Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.6 Table 4.2 Dimensions of different internationalism strategies (Source: Based on Yip, 1989, and Bartlett and Ghoshal, 1989) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.7 Figure 4.2 The international logistics pipeline Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.8 Table 4.3 Characteristics of the international pipeline Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.9 (a) Focused markets: full-range manufacture for local markets (b) Focused factories: limited range manufacturing for all markets Figure 4.3 Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.10 Figure 4.4 Inventory centralisation against logistics costs and service dimensions Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.11 Figure 4.5 Delivery strategies in a global network Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.12 Table 4.4 Three different delivery strategies Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.13 Figure 4.6 Comparison of domestic and international logistics pipelines (Source: After van Hoek, 1998) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.14 Figure 4.7 The trade-off between cost and lead time for international shipping Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.15 Figure 4.8 Location of Asian facilities Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.16 Figure 4.9 Phases in the location selection process Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.17 Table 4.5 Trade-offs between two locations Key: Score on a five-point scale ranging from poor to excellent Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.18 Figure 4.10 Changing role of distribution centres Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.19 Differences in reconfiguration processes for companies depending upon starting point (global or local) Table 4.6 Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.20 Figure 4.11 Stages in the implementation of postponed manufacturing: local starting point (Source: van Hoek, 1998) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.21 Stages in the implementation of postponed manufacturing: global starting point Figure 4.12 (Source: van Hoek, 1998) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.22 Figure 4.13 Example of physical infrastructure set-up with LLP origin in Asia (Source: Leeman, 2007) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.23 Figure 4.14 SCM tools and trade-offs in the supply chain Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.24 Table 4.7 Comparing forward and reverse logistics (Source: Reverse Logistics Executive Council, http://www.rlec.org) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.25 Figure 4.15 CSR practices in the supply chain Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.26 Table 4.8 NEC CSR supplier requests (Source: NEC Group CSR Guideline for Suppliers, https://ift.tt/3gFfgjQ) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 Slide 4.27 Table 4.8 NEC CSR supplier requests (Continued) (Source: NEC Group CSR Guideline for Suppliers, https://ift.tt/3gFfgjQ) Harrison and van Hoek, Logistics Management and Strategy: Competing Through the Supply Chain, 4th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011

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